JLF Western N.C. BlogRSS

Sunday, November, 29 2015


The City of Brevard is boasting its employees are giving to the United Way. I was always told one does not give presents to one’s boss, as that implies he’s paying too much.

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I Need a Seesaw!

Transylvania County and the City of Brevard are undertaking a study to develop a strategic plan to address the population’s needs for recreation. The effort is described as essential.

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Reset, Anyone?

Saith the local daily: State troopers suing North Carolina for millions of dollars in back pay say the state’s broken promises have forced them into tough spots: working second jobs, moving in with parents, even going on food stamps. The remainder of the article is recommended.

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Training Fire-Prone Youth

I must admit, I am a tad skeptical about the potential efficacy of a program highlighted in the local daily, “Buncombe Agencies Work to Stop Arson by Youths.” Buncombe County’s Deputy Fire Marshal Terry Gentry says more than education is needed. Enter Firesafe Together, a new multiagency program in Buncombe County that works with referrals […]

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Visit the Wild West »

Western N.C.'s Greatest Hits

Transit system impact

Asheville's transit system has the smallest impact on regional travel, according to a report by Dr. David Hartgen of UNCC.

Asheville congestion

Future road congestion could threaten North Carolina’s economy, but Asheville is better prepared for congestion than most other N.C. cities.

Shuler and amnesty

U.S. Rep. Heath Shuler, D-N.C., and several Republican members of Congress try get Senate to resist attempts to grant amnesty to illegal immigrants.

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An Alternative Budget: Response to the governor's proposed budget for the upcoming biennium

The John Locke Foundation is continuing its tradition, started in 1995, of offering an alternative to the governor’s budget recommendation. Consistent with prior years, this JLF budget focuses on core government. This budget spends less in both years of the biennium than the governor’s, and only increases spending by 2 percent from the last fiscal year.

By The Numbers: What Government Costs in North Carolina Cities and Counties FY 2012

The economic recession that hit full force in 2008 was declared officially over in June 2009 when the country experienced two quarters of very slow growth. But a troubled housing sector and a still-sluggish economy with high unemployment have contributed to the fiscal crises facing many cities and counties in North Carolina. As always, this edition of By the Numbers is must reading for government officials and taxpayers alike. It highlights what kinds of fiscal problems face local governments in an economy that grows only very slowly. With the facts given here, county commissioners and city council members can easily compare their area’s tax burden to similarly situated cities or counties. For taxpayers, BTN is a starting point for questions about taxes and spending, enabling them to hold their elected and appointed officials accountable.

Agenda 2014: A Candidate's Guide to Key Issues in North Carolina Public Policy

Every two years since 1996, coinciding with North Carolina's races for the General Assembly, the John Locke Foundation has published a revised edition of Agenda, our public policy guide for candidates and voters. Typically as we enter the campaign season, candidates for public office in North Carolina are faced with a daunting task: to develop informed positions on dozens of public policy issues. In the pages of Agenda 2014 we provide a concise and easily digestible guide covering a wide range of specific issues, from taxes and spending to energy policy and education.

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